Chaw Kalayar-Sexyand beauty pose outdoor photos

Chaw Kalayar-Sexyand beauty pose outdoor photos

Chaw Kalayar-Sexyand beauty pose outdoor photos

Chaw Kalayar-Sexyand beauty pose outdoor photos

Myanmar Model-Chaw Kalayar

Wilderness or wildland is a natural environment on Earth that has not been significantly modified by human activity.[1] The term has traditionally referred to terrestrial environments, though growing attention is being placed on marine wilderness. Recent maps of wilderness[2] suggest it covers roughly one quarter of Earth’s terrestrial surface, but is being rapidly degraded by human activity.[3] Even less wilderness remains in the ocean, with only 13.2% free from intense human activity.[4]

Some governments establish protection for wilderness areas by law to not only to preserve what already exists, but also to promote and advance a natural expression and development. These can be set up in preserves, conservation preserves, National Forests, National Parks and even in urban areas along rivers, gulches or otherwise undeveloped areas. Often these areas are considered important for the survival of certain species, biodiversity, ecological studies, conservation, solitude, and recreation.[5] They may also preserve historic genetic traits and provide habitat for wild flora and fauna that may be difficult to recreate in zoos, arboretums or laboratories.

Looked at through the lens of the visual arts, nature and wildness have been important subjects in various epochs of world history. An early tradition of landscape art occurred in the Tang Dynasty (618-907). The tradition of representing nature as it is became one of the aims of Chinese painting and was a significant influence in Asian art. Artists in the tradition of Shan shui (lit. mountain-water-picture), learned to depict mountains and rivers “from the perspective of nature as a whole and on the basis of their understanding of the laws of nature… as if seen through the eyes of a bird.” In the 13th century, Shih Erh Chi recommended avoiding painting “scenes lacking any places made inaccessible by nature.”[6]

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