Eaindra Kyaw Zin-good performace and beauty actress

Eaindra Kyaw Zin-good performace and beauty actress

Eaindra Kyaw Zin-good performace and beauty actress

Eaindra Kyaw Zin-good performace and beauty actress

Eaindra Kyaw Zin-good performace and beauty actress

Myanmar Actress-Eaindra Kyaw Zin

An actor is a person who portrays a character in a performance (also actress; see below).[1] The actor performs “in the flesh” in the traditional medium of the theatre or in modern media such as film, radio, and television. The analogous Greek term is ὑποκριτής (hupokritḗs), literally “one who answers”.[2] The actor’s interpretation of their role—the art of acting—pertains to the role played, whether based on a real person or fictional character. Interpretation occurs even when the actor is “playing themselves”, as in some forms of experimental performance art.

Formerly, in ancient Greece and Rome, the medieval world, and the time of William Shakespeare, only men could become actors, and women’s roles were generally played by men or boys.[3] After the English Restoration of 1660, women began to appear on stage in England. In modern times, particularly in pantomime and some operas, women occasionally play the roles of boys or young men.[4]
After 1660 in England, when women first started to appear on stage, the terms actor or actress were initially used interchangeably for female performers, but later, influenced by the French actrice, actress became the commonly used term for women in theater and film. The etymology is a simple derivation from actor with -ess added.[5] When referring to groups of performers of both sexes, actors is preferred.[6] Actor is also used before the full name of a performer as a gender-specific term.

Within the profession, the re-adoption of the neutral term dates to the post-war period of the 1950 and ’60s, when the contributions of women to cultural life in general were being reviewed.[7] When The Observer and The Guardian published their new joint style guide in 2010, it stated “Use [‘actor’] for both male and female actors; do not use actress except when in name of award, e.g. Oscar for best actress.”[6] The guide’s authors stated that “actress comes into the same category as authoress, comedienne, manageress, ‘lady doctor’, ‘male nurse’ and similar obsolete terms that date from a time when professions were largely the preserve of one sex (usually men).” (See male as norm). “As Whoopi Goldberg put it in an interview with the paper: ‘An actress can only play a woman. I’m an actor – I can play anything.'”[6] The UK performers’ union Equity has no policy on the use of “actor” or “actress”. An Equity spokesperson said that the union does not believe that there is a consensus on the matter and stated that the “…subject divides the profession”.[6] In 2009, the Los Angeles Times stated that “Actress” remains the common term used in major acting awards given to female recipients[8] (e.g., Academy Award for Best Actress).

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